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Mixed Greens

April 07, 2011

Mixed Greens

Although we hate to admit it, it is often true that this information overload, fast like a bullet, crazy spread like wildfire technology world we live in can get a little bit overwhelming. There is so much out there we want to read, learn, activate, spread, like, share, twit that it often times feels hard to concentrate and fully comprehend  just one thing.

Take Twitter for example, an amazing tool for mass dialogue and communication, yet for those that are either beginning to tweet themselves in this new microblogging world or those that are already tweet-hooked, it sometimes gets hard to filter which information is relevant, true and valuable (even if it is only in 140 character bits).  This brings us to the conclusion that an important advancement in this field of communication is and will be the editorializing of this type of information, at least for those that want it to be.


Take Mixed Greens, an initiative by MNN (Mother Nature Network) who believed that there is so many voices and conversations dealing with sustainability on twitter that they decided to put out a type of guide to the best conversations of sustainability on Twitter.

Mixed Greens is a group of the most thought provoking leaders from Pulitzer Prize journalist Nicholas Kristof to primatologist Jane Goodall to alternative energy guru Shai Agass. With diverse backgrounds and expertise, these voices share a common interest in the balance equation of sustainability, thus which intersects environment, social and economic interests.


The election of these 10 pioneers of sustainability came from the simple question- "If I didn't know anything about sustainability who should I listen to for the unvarnished truth?"
Another triple win. MNN wins audiences attention and approval for being the channel that editorializes and facilitates information gathering. The visitor wins because it is easier for them to see the full spectrum of ideas that are out there. And ultimately, progress and development wins because more people will be better informed about sustainability.